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Milk storage unit uses sun to keep cool

Got chilled milk?______

That’s the unofficial slogan for Boston-based Promethean Power Systems, a company that this month received a grant from the National Science Foundation to further develop its innovative milk refrigeration system.

Promethean’s target market is India, though it plans to expand to Africa and Latin America as soon as February. India is the world’s largest producer and consumer of milk; the country is home to some 70 million farmers who contribute to a multibillion-dollar dairy market.

Because temperatures can reach 100 degrees during peak summer months, raw milk begins to spoil within hours of collection. And India’s frequent blackouts, due to a strained power grid, make it difficult to keep milk cold enough.

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Ushdev May Seek India Wind Farm Acquisitions to Boost Capacity

The clean-energy unit of Ushdev International Ltd. (UTF), India’s third-largest non-state metal trader, may seek to acquire wind farms to boost its capacity 10- fold by 2014.

Ushdev Power Holdings Pvt. plans to invest 18 billion rupees ($400 million) to add 100 megawatts of wind energy capacity annually over the next three years, Arvind Prasad, managing director of the unit, said in an interview in Mumbai.

By 2018, Ushdev Power may seek to build as much as 1,000 megawatts of renewable energy capacity, roughly equivalent to one nuclear plant, which could also include solar, hydropower and biomass plants, he said.

“We’re open to both greenfield projects and also looking at existing wind farms,” Prasad said.

India’s fragmented wind sector may undergo some consolidation as companies look to build scale, Adam Forsyth, a partner at London-based investment bank Matrix Group Ltd., said on June 1. Indian Energy Ltd. (IEL), a London-listed operator of wind farms backed by Lloyds Banking Group Plc (LLOY), said on June 1 it would sell its projects in the South Asian nation if talks with a potential investor fell through.

Mumbai-based Ushdev Power currently owns 30.5 megawatts of wind farms in six different states that use turbines made by Denmark’s Vestas Wind Systems A/S, as well as Germany’s Enercon GmbH and Kenersys GmbH, Prasad said.

The parent company is India’s largest, private trader of metals by revenue after Surana Corp. and Adani Enterprises Ltd., according to data from Capital Market magazine. It incorporated its wind unit last year, Prasad said.

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Banking on solar power

Nice ATM

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Vortex Engineering, a company focused on developing sustainable products for rural India, decides to develop an ATM to meet this segment’s banking demands. The ATM is powered by solar energy consumes just 4 per cent of the total energy that is required by a conventional ATM to function. It has the capability to serve Indian villages — indicating an opportunity for over half a million ATMs across the country. Read how Vortex Engineering’s unique ATM can help deal with the problem of low banking penetration in the third of the five-part series from India Brand Equity Foundation’s Innovations from India: Harbingers of Change.

The delivery of financial services to all sections of society at an affordable cost has been an area of concern for governments around the world. Financial services include services such as credit, savings, and insurance. To date, banks have been considered the most preferred channel for providing financial services. However, the banking channel has its own limitations, especially in nations that have a large rural population and diverse geographical conditions. This results in a low concentration of banking systems in rural areas. Rural locations account for around 70 per cent of the total population of India, but have access to only 30 per cent of the total bank branches of the country. Read the rest of this entry

Sunny India needs German solar technology

During her day’s sojourn in India earlier this month on the invitation of the Indian Prime Minister Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, held inter-governmental consultations, quite unusually, at the cabinet level. Such cabinet-level discussions are held with very few countries. India is the first Asian country with which such discussions have been held. About half a dozen ministers accompanied her with the intentions of further expanding and intensifying economic cooperation between the two countries. Germany is the largest trading partner of India in the European Union.

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India set to produce 700 MW solar power in 2011

India is on track to produce 700 megawatts of solar power at a cost of $2.2 billion by December, ahead of an initial target for an ambitious plan that seeks to boost green power generation from near zero to 20 gigawatts (GW) by 2022.

Under India’s Solar Mission , investors bid to build solar power plants and the winning bids are determined by the electricity tariff that they accept as viable. Such has been the interest that the government has been flooded with investment pledges for the first batch of projects rolling out in December.

India’s 20 GW solar plan is likely to attract overall investment of about $70 billion, the government has estimates. Issued in 2009, the plan envisages India producing 1,300 megawatts (MW) by 2013, another up to 10 GW by 2017 and the rest by 2022.

“The entire solar industry is no longer worried about the upheavals that are taking place in the European markets because they find a very new and very promising market is developing in India,” said Debashish Majumdar, chairman and managing director of Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency.

IREDA, a state-run agency, is the leader in the country’s solar energy financing.

“So far, every year the general mood was that nobody knew what would happen to the German policy or what would happen to Spanish policy,” said Majumdar, who attended a global summit on clean technologies in Munich last week.

Germany , the world’s top solar power producer with about 17 GW installed by end-2010, is considering cutting incentives for photovoltaic energy by an additional six percentage points in another step on March 1, 2012.

Germany, Spain , Italy, Japan and the United States are the leading producers of solar power in the world. While India’s solar sector remains a risky venture because of a shortage of data and trained manpower, such deficiencies also open up a huge market for expertise and technology such as Colorado-based Juwi Solar, Schneider , Schott Solar.

“The (Solar Mission’s) second phase would create a very large market for service providers, especially EPC contractors and people who can analyse data to ascertain how much resources like sunlight are available and how much (solar energy) is going to be produced,” Majumdar said.

“These agencies would get lots of business,” he told the Reuters Global Energy and Climate Summit in New Delhi, adding it was still not possible to determine the size of such a market.

EPC contractors handle the engineering, procurement and construction of solar power plants.

SUNSHINE POLICIES

If everything goes to plan, and the rollout of the first projects in December should be an indicator, solar would contribute the equivalent to one-eighth of India’s current installed power base by 2022.

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Johnson Controls May Seek to Build Solar-Power Plants in India

Johnson Controls Inc. (JCI), a U.S. developer of energy-saving technology and hybrid car batteries, may seek to enter India’s solar industry as a plant contractor.

“We think there’s a tremendous opportunity” to engineer, build and operate plants for project developers, Pramoda Karkal, managing director at Milwaukee, Wisconsin-based company’s Indian unit, said in an interview in Mumbai.

India has awarded licenses to build at least 1,100 megawatts of solar capacity by next January, roughly equivalent to one new nuclear power plant and about 30 times what exists today. Companies are racing to line up financing and contractors for projects to meet their deadlines.

Within 20 years, India’s solar sector could create a $50 billion market and rival China’s, Karkal estimated.

“There are thousands and thousands of remote villages in India without a connection to the electricity grid,” he said. “Rather than laying miles of copper lines, it’s cheaper to build a solar plant. That’s why solar will take off quickly here.”

Johnson Controls had global sales of $12.8 billion last year installing equipment and controls for air-conditioning, heating, refrigeration and other processes that allow buildings to reduce energy consumption. The systems it has installed since 2000 have saved $7.5 billion in operating costs, the company estimates.

India is trying to pass legislation that would restrict the energy consumed by commercial buildings. If successful, that could create a $500 million market within five years for services in Asia’s third-largest energy consumer, Karkal said.

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Synapse Helps Make Clean Electricity Affordable for Low Income Households in India

Synapse Helps Make Clean Electricity Affordable for Low Income Households in India
Pay-As-You-Go Solar Energy System from Simpa Networks Improves Quality of Life While Reducing Fossil Fuel Consumption.

Synapse Product Development engineers are currently helping Simpa Networks realize their idea to bring clean, safe, and sustainable energy services to 20 million people by 2020 through a pay-as-you-go in-home solar energy system.

“We are always looking for ways to work with Clients whose values are culturally similar to ours,” said Chris Massot, Vice President of Sales & Marketing of Synapse. “Working with Simpa is a wonderful opportunity for us to use technology to promote the expansion of sustainable energy.”

Synapse designed and built the Simpa Regulator™ prototypes currently being tested with customers in Bangalore, India. The Simpa Regulator™ hardware platform enables the Progressive Purchase™ pricing model by metering and adjusting electricity availability in response to the entry of payment codes by customers. The result is a secure, low-cost, intuitive, rugged, and tamper proof device that allows Simpa to test and prove their new pricing model with real customers, giving them valuable new information about customer needs and desires.

“Our engineering team developed a cost-optimized hardware platform in a tamper-proof enclosure running an encrypted payment entry and validation scheme,” said Cameron Charles, Project Manager at Synapse. “This has been a great opportunity for our team to design something for a set of users who would not normally have access to this type of product.”

Nearly 1.6 billion people lack access to electricity, and another one billion lack reliable grid connections. Most rely on traditional fuel such as kerosene for lighting and often need to travel great distances for services such as mobile phone charging. These energy expenditures can consume up to 30% of household income.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with Synapse through this critical phase of development,” said Paul Needham, President of Simpa Networks. “Their team was able to understand our requirements and develop a solution that was ready for installation in customer homes. Based on our synthesis of customer feedback, Synapse was able to quickly turn around new iterations of our Simpa Regulator™ which were back in front of customers right away for real-time testing.”

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Rajasthan Solar Energy Policy 2011

Rajasthan Solar Energy Policy, 2011 pdf

In order to promote generation of power from Solar Energy, the State Government hereby makes the Rajasthan Solar Energy Policy, 2011 as attached.

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SunTechnics is now ‘Conergy’

Conergy

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The Solar Energy Company to adopt parent Company Name

SunTechnics Energy Systems, one of India’s largest companies dedicated to solar energy today announced that it would adopt its parent company name “Conergy” and be recognized going forward as Conergy Energy Systems. SunTechnics began its Indian operations in 2005 and the name change is in line with the company’s strategy to be recognized as “Conergy” worldwide.

Further to this announcement, the Indian entity will now focus largely on small and large scale solar photovoltaic projects. The company operates two core businesses: grid-connect systems (large scale solar parks) and off grid systems (Stand alone SPV Systems). The company’s product portfolio will continue to include Conergy grid-connect components, sourced from its European and North American factories and off-grid systems produced from its Bangalore facility which for the time being will continue to be promoted under the SunTechnics brand.

Conergy’s customers in India include giants in the telecom, oil and gas, government nodal agencies and manufacturing sectors, as well as the state and national government units.

Speaking on the development Mr. Prakash Shetty, CEO and Director of SunTechnics said, “The initiative to adopt our parent company’s name coupled with Conergy’s continued expansion and active participation in this market is a clear indication of Conergy’s long-term commitment to the strategic Indian market. The Indian market is strongly driven by a high need for electricity. Off-grid is one of Conergy’s pillars for success and growth in India, with booming sectors like rural electrification, rooftop systems, BIPV, telecommunications, railways – of which we own a significant market share. The Year 2011 started with a well planned expansion of the company’s SPV module manufacturing capacity from 4 MW to 25 MW which was followed by several significant orders that has helped Conergy develop a formidable business backlog. Our EPC business has developed very encouragingly due to the support from the National Solar Mission and incentives from individual states. India’s National Solar Mission calls for the installation of 20 GW by 2020.”

Strong growth expected
Solar energy has gained considerable importance in Asia over the past year – and the market will continue to grow rapidly. Industry experts at Bank Sarasin Asia estimate that in 2010 solar PV installations grew by 87% percent globally.

In 2010, the most promising market was India, which grew by 166 percent. Bank Sarasin estimates that India recorded 80 MW of newly installed solar capacity last year. Furthermore, they anticipate that the Indian PV market will grow by 76% annually in the period from 2009 to 2015.

About the Conergy Group
Conergy is the only solar company worldwide that delivers synchronised solar systems. The system manufacturer produces all components needed for solar installation under one roof. Furthermore, all necessary services related to the solar plants come from one single source.

The Conergy System Services deliver the “Total Sleep-easy Package” for the Conergy System Technology. From the planning and financing to the engineering, installation and all the way to the monitoring, maintenance, operational and commercial management and insurance, Conergy offers a service package to cover all possible services for one’s own solar plant.

The Conergy System Sales takes Conergy’s premium products and services directly to the customer in nearly 40 different countries. With 24 subsidiaries in 14 countries on four continents, the solar group operates closer to the customer than any other solar company. This way, the solar experts have generated more than half of their sales outside of Germany.

The company today employs more than 1,700 people. Since Conergy was founded, it has produced and sold more than 1.5 GW of clean solar energy. More energy than two average nuclear reactors or coal-fuelled power stations can produce.

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World-Bank Backed Azure Starts Up Solar-Power Plant in India

Image representing Azure Power as depicted in ...

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Azure Power, an Indian developer of solar power plants backed by the World Bank, has started running a 5-megawatt project in western India.

The state government of Gujarat will buy power from the plant under a 25-year power purchase agreement, the New Delhi– based company said in an e-mailed statement. The International Finance Corp., the private-sector financing arm of the World Bank, is an investor in the project.

The 1.7 billion-rupee ($38 million) project at Khadoda village in Gujarat’s Sabarkantha district will be expanded to 10 megawatts by the time it’s completed, Azure said.

Other investors include the U.S. Overseas Private Investment Corp. and two venture-capital firms — Helion Advisors, based in Gurgaon near New Delhi, and Menlo Park, California-based Foundation Capital, Azure said.

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